Laser Therapy

LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY (LLLT) is a noninvasive procedure that uses light to stimulate cell regeneration and increase blood circulation. Unlike laser surgery, which uses a powerful laser to cut tissue, cold laser therapy uses a low energy laser to apply heat. Cold laser therapy may be used to treat the surface of the skin as well as deeper tissues of muscles, joints and bones.
Often called cold laser therapy, LLLT is increasingly being used more recently to treat horses with arthritis, tendon or soft tissue injuries and to promote wound healing.
Laser therapy can treat acute and chronic injuries, sprains and strains, arthritis, swelling due to back disc problems, and muscular-skeletal abnormalities. It also helps to regenerate nerve tissue after surgery.
Laser therapy can be useful alone or in conjunction with chiropractic and traditional veterinary therapies for:
Musculoskeletal pain
Ear infections
Swollen joints
Wound healing
Skin infections and diseases
Inflammation
Tendon and suspensory injuries such as tears, tendinitis and desmitis
Synovitis and tenosynovitis
Osteoarthritis
Back disorders
Nerve tissue regeneration
Postoperative care
  • Musculoskeletal pain
  • Ear infections
  • Swollen joints
  • Wound healing
  • Skin infections and diseases
  • Inflammation
  • Tendon and suspensory injuries such as tears, tendinitis and desmitis
  • Synovitis and tenosynovitis
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Back disorders
  • Nerve tissue regeneration
  • Postoperative care
  • Lasers are nothing more than a beam of light that travels at a certain frequency (infrared with an 808 nanometer wavelength in the case of PES) that allows the laser to generate heat and penetrate tissue.
    A typical laser therapy session lasts between three to 20 minutes depending on the location, severity, extent and depth of the injury.
    There's no need to shave or clip the area to be treated and the horse doesn't need to be sedated during the process. That means that treatment can be applied multiple times a day or a number of times per week.
    Before treatment begins, Dr. Page will examine the horse to assess if chiropractic and/or laser therapy is viable treatment option.
    If you have a horse with arthritis, laser treatment will typically begin with two to three sessions per week, then decrease sessions to once a week, then once every two weeks or once a month.
    After laser treatment horses typically have better mobility and medications can often be reduced.
    Laser therapy won't cause your horse any unwanted side effects. The laser used for this type of treatment will not burn your horse's skin.
    Laser therapy improves the quality of a horse's life as well as the life of its owner, because if your horse is happy, you are happy.